Friday, May 29, 2009

Redcoats on the Common

Tour guide dressed as a Colonial British soldier. Here is another view of a tour guide.

13 comments:

amatamari said...

A jump colored in the past!

:-)

joo said...

Wow,like journey past in time:)
He look great in this uniform against geen trees!

Malyss said...

That's a good idea!it give a stronger feeling of diving back into the past; And the guide will be easily followed by tourists, they won't lose him!

Christopher Raun Leth said...

A guide like this is a good thing to get the attension of the the turists.

Jacob said...

You composed this photo very well! And the colors are super! This guy sure looks a lot more fit than the one in your previous post!

Harriet said...

Great colors in this photo. I love the red uniform against the green background.

Life With Dogs said...

I grew up in Gettysburg, and have always had an appreciation for history - love this!

hip chick said...

Great photo. Getting to see this fun stuff all the time is the best part of living in the city. I'm going to try to get into Concord sometime this summer to see the reenactments.

cieldequimper said...

I love the way you took that photo, with the two young people obviously very interested!

Vogon Poet said...

Great shot, fine uniform and beautiful colours.

Virginia said...

Thanks for your visit to my blog. I am in Paris for a while and so I might not get around so much but I love your photos. I'll be back, I promise!
V

Without A Map said...

To a modern generation, wearing a bright red coat into battle may seem a rather crazy thing to do.

On 19 February 1645, the English parliament passed the New Model Army Ordinance. The infantry regiments wore coats of Venetian red with white facings. The original intention was to use blue uniforms, but red was cheaper. The dye used for much of the history of the Red Coat, was cochineal dye.

During the Horse and Musket era it was normal practice for enemy scouts to be sent out to count the numbers of the opposing force lined up in battle formation. However the bright red colour of the massed British soldiers tended to optically blur into a solid wall of colour-thus making it extremely difficult for the enemy scouts to accurately assess the strength of the British forces arrayed against them.

Red Coat or Redcoat is a term often used to refer to a soldier of the historical British Army, because of the colour of the military uniforms formerly worn by the majority of regiments. The uniform of most British soldiers from the late 17th century to the 19th century. The ‘Red Coats’ {The Thin Red Line}.

Great photography.

tapirgal said...

Your picture is bringing back fond memories of that day in Lexington. We had a nice tour guide. Did not get a chance to experience the guides in Boston.